Feet

The Best Shoes for Dancers with High Arches

10:14 AM

*This guest post is written by one of Beyond the Barre's partners, Jane from Things Nurses Like! Check out her blog here.

Here’s the thing about dancer’s feet – not only do they play a huge role in performing those graceful movements on stage, but they carry them through their everyday lives, as well. A never-ending job, huh?

But high arches in dancers come at a certain price – and an unpleasant one.  



high arches in dancers, supportive shoes for dancers

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High arches seem to be the desired type of ballet feet. Pair those high arches with high insteps, and you get the “ideal” look. Unfortunately, when you’re done dancing for the day, you can’t just put them away with the rest of your equipment – your ballet feet are there to stay.

High Arches - On Stage vs. Everyday Life


So, what’s the big deal?

No matter how graceful your feet look on stage, in everyday life, without proper support, they can turn out to be quite a problem. Since feet with higher arches aren’t capable of absorbing the impact of walking or running as well, your ankles, knees, hips, and even your lower back take the blow.

To give you an idea of why it's so important, here are a few complications you may run into if you have high arches and insteps: 
  • Pain and discomfort in the ball of the foot or the heel 
  • Stress fractures of the metatarsals 
  • Morton’s neuroma 
  • Ankle instability and sprains 
  • Higher risk of plantar fasciitis

Arch Support Outside Of Dance Class: Shoes For High Arch Feet

The key terms you should be looking for are arch support and cushioning.

Why?

When you have high arches, comfort means a lot more than just finding a pair that fits – it means balance, support, and cushioning, all in one.

Your shoes need to be able to distribute your weight across the foot, removing the pressure from the ball of your foot and the heel. As a result, your ankles and knees won’t suffer nearly as much as they would if you wore lower-quality shoes.

Now, let’s talk shoes for high arch feet! Here are a few comfortable pairs you can try out this summer:

#1 - Alegria Women's Paloma Flat




The fact that these shoes are approved by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) should tell you a lot about how beneficial they might be for you. The shape of the outsole causes a slight rocking motion - the idea is to roll the pressure off your front metatarsals – while the footbed distributes your weight throughout the bottom of your foot.

#2 - L`amour Des Pieds Womens Brenn Sandal




Who says you can’t look nice and be comfortable at the same time? If you’re looking for a pair of shoes that offer all the support and comfort of sneakers, but can make you shine off stage, as you do on it, there’s no point in looking any further.

Sure, they are a bit pricey, but they’re worth every dime!

#3 - Saucony Women's Grid Omni Walker




Some ladies are all about comfort and sporty outfits on their off days, so of course, this list wouldn’t be complete without a pair of walking shoes. Everything about these shoes revolves around supporting high arches – from anti-pronation technology (compression insoles and asymmetrical midsoles) to the biomechanical fit.

High Arches In Dancers: Final Thoughts

I don’t have to tell you how important your feet are to you, and they take on a lot of pressure every time you dance – the least you can do is keep them comfortable outside of dance class!

Finding the right shoes can be a bit of a trial-and-error process, so I hope this article was helpful in that aspect. If you have any additional questions about high arches in dancers and issues that come along with having them, feel free to comment below!


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